Posts Tagged ‘Supreme Court’

By Ron B. Lopez

October 14, 2013 (updated)

Posted on Manila Bulletin

 

The wide medical mission of the Iglesia ni Cristo (INC) on Monday drew criticisms and disappointments from commuters and workers as it caused heavy traffic situations in the whole Metro Manila, prompting commuters to walk extra miles or take different routes to reach their destinations.

While recognizing the good intention of the medical mission which was projected to attract 1.6 million INC followers, affected public criticized the huge inconvenience that the event brought to the whole metro, which also prompted local government units to cancel classes, including some colleges, in thirteen cities and one municipality in Metro Manila.

Human Rights lawyer Harry Roque turned to social networking site Twitter to expressed his frustration over the event. “Iglesia ni Cristo holds medical mission and I lose on tuition money that I’ve paid? I want my kids to go to class!” Roque said.

Most people have criticized the day and venue of the medical mission which was set at Quaipo, Manila, with simultaneous activities in other areas in Manila.

Rolando Dalisay gave a piece of advice: “Hope INC will consider doing all these not simultaneously to avoid disruption of people movements, it is counter-productive.”

Writer Norman Sison asked: “If the INC medical mission really about public service, why does it have to cause necessary public disruption?”

Meanwhile, Rain Balares “smells” something on the medical mission of the religious group. “Government allowing this Manila-wide INC medical mission on a weekday, resulting to(sic) backbreaking traffic. Smells like 2016 elections to me,” he said.

Even the Supreme Court Spokesperson Theodore Te was affected by the INC mission. A seemingly annoyed Te has turned to Twitter to vent his questions seeking a “LOGICAL reason” on why the event was permitted by the authorities. He specifically mentioned Manila Mayor Joseph Estrada, Vice Mayor Isko Moreno, MMDA chairman Francis Tolentino, and Interior and Local Government Secretary Mar Roxas who have the power over the area.

“Two hours for a drive that usually takes 20 minutes. Thank you to the mayor and vice mayor of Manila and the peripherals like the @MMDA,” he tweeted.

The Supreme Court itself has been affected by the event as Chief Justice Lourdes Sereno “ordered the suspension of work for the SC and CA including the SB and CTA plus the courts of Manila and QC only, starting at 1:30 PM today,” according to the announcement of the SC Public Information Office.

On the other hand, Popi Sunga asked “how many billions of pesos this INC activity will cost us” considering that based on a study, “the average daily traffic jam in Manila costs P2.4 billion,” he said.

Sen. Miriam Defensor Santiago said that “There is a message behind the INC event today,” and that “if you are a politician and you don’t get it, you are a fool.”

 

READ MORE: http://www.mb.com.ph/inc-medical-mission-draws-heavy-flak/

by Philip M. Lustre Jr.

The Iglesia Ni Cristo is a minority church that is always on the wrong side of history. It has a track record of supporting most unholy causes to pursue certain opportunistic objectives.

It supported the Marcos dictatorial rule and, until its tragic end, it did not say anything, much less act, against the three ills that plagued the Marcos regime: the over centralized graft allegedly committed by Marcos, his family and friends; the unrestrained crony capitalism that benefited Marcos and his crony friends; and, the wanton disregard and violations of human rights that led to torture and disappearances of thousands of political activists and even ordinary citizens.

It is notorious for supporting candidates in every election. Voting as a bloc, the INC is reported to have been using as political leverage its capacity to marshal political support from its members.

It is said to have been currying favor from political leaders, whom it feels to have given the political support to win in elections. It pushes, albeit quietly and without fanfare, the appointment of its members for key government posts. Lately, it is said to have been pushing for the appointments of certain friendly but unqualified non-INC members, but to no avail.

Political opportunism is its hallmark. In the 2010 elections, it was said to have backed up the candidacy of another presidential candidate, but left him for good after he was certain to lose. On the last minutes, it went to support Benigno Aquino III, who incidentally won by more than five million votes from his nearest rival.

Political scientists once studied the INC’s capability and capacity to influence the course of Philippine history. While its members are reputed to vote like automatons in every election, its influence is not that deep.

It could influence the electoral outcome in some local posts, especially in hotly contested congressional districts, cities, towns and provinces. The INC vote could represent the swing vote in those political constituencies.

In national elections, the INC influence is doubtful except for the last two or three slots of the top 12 in every senatorial elections.

Political scientists estimated that the INC bloc is good for 1.2 or 1.3 million votes. While it could monitor the votes in the Culiat area, which hosts its national headquarters in Quezon City, or San
Juan City, where its first church is located, it could hardly monitor votes of its flock in other areas outside of Culiat and San Juan.

In short, its political influence is exaggerated, owing largely to media reports that tend to describe this minority church as powerful and influential.

The political record of the INC is not the only object of concern. The INC is not exactly endearing to the labor movement because of its leaders’ abhorrence to join any legitimate action by workers against business establishments.

Henry Sy’s SM, notorious for allegedly circumventing the Labor Code to its corporate interest, has adopted as an unwritten policy the hiring of workers belonging to INC for reason of “industrial peace.” The same thing has been happening in certain industrial enclaves.

A labor leader once harshly described the INC as “the religion of the scabs.”

Last year, the INC supported then Ombudsman Merceditas Gutierrez, asking certain lawmakers, whom it supported in the 2010 polls, to vote against her impeachment. But an overwhelming majority of the members of the House of Representatives voted for her impeachment, causing
embarrassment for the minority church.

This week, the INC mobilized its members to support embattled Renato Corona in what appears to be a show of force on Tuesday. But it remains questionable whether it could match what the majority church and certain minority churches could jointly muster in certain issues.

As the impeachment trial shows, Corona’s removal from office could be another big embarrassment for the INC, just like what had happened to Gutierrez, who, after she was impeached, chose to quietly resign her post.

Read more here
http://www.manilastandardtoday.com/insideOpinion_mstd.htm?f=%2F%2F2012%2FMarch%2F3%2Feveryman.isx&n=opinion&d=%2F2012%2FMarch%2F3